April 14, 2014

The Shadowhand Covenant

by Brian Farrey
First sentence: "It was exactly the funeral Nanni always wanted."
Support your local independent bookstore: buy it there!
Others in the series: The Vengekeep Prophecies
Content: There's some intense action-related moments, and a small amount of violence, but nothing else. It's perfectly happy in the middle grade (3-5th grade) section of the bookstore.

When we last left our fair Grimjinx family, they were trying to leave behind thieving. Jaxter was off to the Dowager's estate to become apprentice to her, and the rest of the family was becoming (mostly) clean. Six months later, things aren't exactly happy. Jaxter and the Dowager are fighting and he's seriously considering giving up the internship altogether. So, when he heads back for Nanni's "funeral" (it's Par-Goblin custom to throw a funeral when a thief retires), he's pretty much sure that he's going to try and find another line of work.

But then, he, his Ma and Da get summoned by the Shadowhand, a super-secret organization of thieves. Someone's making them disappear. And it seems to be tied up with valuable relics that were stolen from the High Laird. And the Sarosans -- a group of gypsy-like people who are against magic and the Palatinate, the group of mages who seem to be grabbing too much power.

Of course, Jaxter gets involved (though not because he wants to; his hand is kind of forced), and he uses his knowledge of plants and powers of deduction to help him -- and his friends -- out.

Much of what I loved about the first book in this series is back: I adore the Grimjinxes as a family. They're fantastic. It's not very often that you have amazing parents in middle grade, but Ma and Da are them. Sure, Farrey has to find a way to separate Jaxter from them so he can have adventures. But they're so supportive and just plain good people (thieving aside, of course). And I still love how bookish Jaxter is. He's not athletic, and he's terrible at magic, but somehow he makes his book knowledge work for him.

I also liked the action in this one; Farrey has a good sense of action sequences, and there were a couple of moments when I was on the edge of my seat, wondering what's going to happen next.

And Farrey does a series right: each of these books have their own plot, wrapping it up by the final pages, while having a slower over-arcing plot weave them together. The writing's smart, the characters fun. It's fantastic.

1 comment:

Kailana said...

That is definitely doing a series right. I wish more authors did that.